Earn Steady Corporate Bonds Yield Instead of Buying Stocks From The Top

 In Specials

corporate bond yield

Right now is the perfect time to buy investment-grade corporate bonds. Although many of you may think stocks are too attractive to pass up at the moment, this kind of thinking is going to cost you dearly.

TRY INCOMECLUB DEMO.WE WILL BUILD A BOND PORTFOLIO SAMPLE FOR YOU,AT NO CHARGE.

Why Stocks Aren’t Your Friend Right Now

Conventional wisdom seems to be that stocks are always a good place to put your investment budget. However, the current condition of the stock market should give you plenty of reasons to question this kind of advice.

To me, it’s as clear as day, which is why corporate bonds yield are so much more attractive. The price-earnings ratio (“P/E”) right now for the stock market is extremely overvalued. Currently, it’s sitting at 25.38. Compare that to 10 in 1980.

“US equity valuations have become stretched on numerous metrics, one of which is the value of the S&P 500 relative to US GDP which has risen to historic highs that have even exceeded the dot-com bubble” said DoubleLine CEO Jef Gundlach, at the Ira Sohn investor conference yesterday.

This means that most of those who own stocks are probably in for a rude awakening pretty soon.Again, see why I’m excited about what corporate bonds yield right now over investing in stocks?

I can’t imagine anything worse for someone—especially a Baby Boomers—to do right now than buy stocks when they are most likely at their height in terms of price.

Corporate Bonds Besting S&P 500

Investment-grade corporate bonds further support my optimism. Right now, they are providing an average effective yield 3.05%, that is much larger compare to the 1.93% current dividend yield of S&P 500. In fact, in many cases,

In fact, in many cases, the corporate bonds yield is actually besting this index.

Interest Rates May Continue to Raise

The Fed will continue to raise interest rates in the near future. When this happens, it is likely that investment-grade corporate bonds will see improved yields as well.

I think that there is a lot of room to the historical mean of between 5% and 6%.

Examples of What Corporate Bonds Yield

To further drive home my point, let’s look at some examples of what corporate bonds can yield today:

CouponMaturityYield to Maturity
Xerox3.800%05.15..20243.951%
Symantec3.950%03.15.20223.410%
Arrow Electronics5.125%03.01.20212.897%
Ford3.664%09.08.20243.800%

Those were concrete examples, but let’s look at a hypothetical now of what could happen.

Let’s say you have $10,000 you want to put to work for you by investing. Then, let’s say you’re getting 3.5% back on it; that’s a very realistic amount given the returns we just saw from investment-grade corporate bonds—and, remember, those really happened.

After 10 years, you’d be looking at $14,105.99 after compounding interest is applied. That’s obviously a substantial amount. However, after 20 years, that investment would have nearly doubled, totaling $19,897.89.

For you Millennials, it may be realistic to have your investment period be 30 years. In that case, you would almost triple your initial investment, ending up with $28,067.94.

While stock market valuation is high at the moment, even long term investors like Millennials could use a bond ladder investment approach (with three to five years being used for the length of the ladder) to save for retirement until the stock market’s valuation drops to an attractive level.

If someone has a time horizon up to five years (e.g., a Millennial, who is saving for their children’s education or baby boomers at 65 who must begin withdrawing funds from IRAs accounts ), investing in individual bonds is might be the only available option for them.

Personal Finance

Disclosure:

IncomeClubis an online investment advisor, specializing in bond investing. Whether you are new to bonds or an experienced bond investor, we provide deep expertise in fixed-income investing, individualized advice, access to global bond markets, and convenient online account management.

IncomeClub, Inc.isa SEC registered investment adviser. All IncomeClub’s customer assets are held in the customer’s name with Interactive Brokers, LLC, Member FINRA/SIPC.

Past performance is no guarantee of future results. Any historical returns, expected returns, or probability projections may not reflect actual future performance. All securities involve risk and may result inaloss. While bonds may provide an assurance of predictable return, there is a risk of default of particular issuer and there can be no assurance that an investment mix or any projected or actual performance will lead to the expected results shown or perform in any predictable manner.

Bonds are subject to interest rate, inflation, credit and default risk. The bond market is volatile. When investing in bonds in a rising rates environment, investors must be ready to see continually decreasing bonds prices and their recovering before maturity and thus must be ready to keep bonds until maturity.

Although IncomeClub has detailed pre-selection process andtrusted view and ratings of Moody’s and Standard & Poor’s, IncomeClub does not guarantee the quality of particular bond or that it will: 1) not be downgraded and notablylose its value; 2) not default until maturity; 3) recover all losses after default event; 4) be liquid or its market will be maintained.

Our reports and articles are never an investment advice and an offer to buy or sell any security. Investors should consider the investment objectives and risks carefully before investing.

Sergey Sanko
Sergey had started an IncomeClub after years of being an investment advisor for high affluent investors and managing fixed income securities. He is the lead investment advisor representative and holds a Series 65 license. Sergey earned his Executive MBA degree from Antwerp Management School.
Recommended Posts